30 9 / 2014

witchhboy:

Halloween Give Away!!!

Trick or treat! Thank you followers and past customers for supporting my work! Please share with all your friends, Happy Halloween!

Prize: A mystery bundle of handmade goodies from my shop worth $50!

How to Enter:

- Follow this blog.

- Reblog this post.

You can reblog as many times as you like, but please don’t spam your followers. No give away blogs, and likes don’t count. The give away ends on October 31st and I’ll pick one winner at random shortly after. You must be over 18 to enter, or have your guardian’s permission to enter, and your ask box must be open. I will contact you from my main blog the-graeae, please respond asap - if the winner doesn’t reply within 72 hours I will choose another winner. Enjoy!

etsy / storenvy

There’s some great stuff on this blog and also giveaways…

(via brittbland)

29 9 / 2014

bastardsinblue:

Generacion Suicida @ Dog Haus

(via femaletroubleradio)

29 9 / 2014

razorcake:

Generacion Suicida Interview Podcast

Los Angeles is an unsolved mystery that’s shattered into hundreds of pieces: mirrors, daggers, broken things. In Los Angeles, DIY punk isn’t one thing. It’s not a unified scene, which is both a blessing and a curse. It’s a wide, fissured spectrum, a spectrum that also gets routinely shattered or too-thinly sliced by subgenre. It’s fractured by the immense geography of Los Angeles itself. People—punks included—become isolated by rivers, freeways, social class, customs, race, transit lines, and invisible lines that separate neighborhoods, sometimes mid-street that you’d never know about until you live there yourself or are shown by someone who does. Further deepen that segregation with generations-old neighborhood pride and prejudice, to friends parting ways over ego, to hubris, and issues of trying to become the police chiefs of their punk scenes. The isolation and separation doesn’t end at doorsteps. It goes deeper, more personal, to the spelling and slanginess of the words, to birthplaces, to skin color, to the darkness or lightness of skin color within a skin color. To blood, family, things you have no control over when you come into this world.Welcome to Los Angeles.

click here to download the podcast!

Generacion Suicida’s a four-piece band. They play icy, angular, catchy punk with oscillating male/female voices creating a serrated edge of paranoia and anxiety. It’s right up my alley. I highly recommend their entire catalog. (Their debut album Con La Muerte a Tu Lado was just released and it’s amazing.) Two of its members are from South Central L.A. One lives in Koreatown, another in Anaheim, Orange County. None are from East L.A. They sing solely in Spanish and remind me of bands from other countries, mainly Umeå, Sweden—in the Ny Våg tradition of the Vicious—and Copenhagen—Gorilla Angreb and No Hope For The Kids—which sort of brings the sound back home to California because those Scandinavian bands borrowed heavily from Los Angeles’s past (late ‘70s Dangerhouse, especially). The irony didn’t escape me. I’m more conversant in the language of songs of many bands that are based 5,317 miles from Razorcake HQ than I am in some of the bands that live less than twenty miles away. It’s not like I’m trying to be willfully ignorant of punk in my hometown. That’s just the nature of the beast here in L.A. One mile past the last bus stop often is the end of the world.Los Angeles is its own country. The up side is this: some of the best DIY punk in the world has been and is being made in Los Angeles. We have a rich, diverse heritage. One that’s as great as it is totally fucked and frustrating. But it’s this real fight to be heard—even in your neighborhood—to make meaningful music that gives it such vitality, such uniqueness. What do White Murder, Wreck Of The Zephyr, Thee Undertakers, Toys That Kill, Neighborhood Brats, Rough Kids, Spokenest, and Generacion Suicida have in common besides they’re active punk bands in L.A.? Not much, except they all rule in their own distinctive ways. And that’s what keeps being a punk in L.A. exciting. 

razorcake:

Generacion Suicida Interview Podcast

Los Angeles is an unsolved mystery that’s shattered into hundreds of pieces: mirrors, daggers, broken things. In Los Angeles, DIY punk isn’t one thing. It’s not a unified scene, which is both a blessing and a curse. It’s a wide, fissured spectrum, a spectrum that also gets routinely shattered or too-thinly sliced by subgenre. It’s fractured by the immense geography of Los Angeles itself. People—punks included—become isolated by rivers, freeways, social class, customs, race, transit lines, and invisible lines that separate neighborhoods, sometimes mid-street that you’d never know about until you live there yourself or are shown by someone who does. Further deepen that segregation with generations-old neighborhood pride and prejudice, to friends parting ways over ego, to hubris, and issues of trying to become the police chiefs of their punk scenes. The isolation and separation doesn’t end at doorsteps. It goes deeper, more personal, to the spelling and slanginess of the words, to birthplaces, to skin color, to the darkness or lightness of skin color within a skin color. To blood, family, things you have no control over when you come into this world.

Welcome to Los Angeles.

click here to download the podcast!

Generacion Suicida’s a four-piece band. They play icy, angular, catchy punk with oscillating male/female voices creating a serrated edge of paranoia and anxiety. It’s right up my alley. I highly recommend their entire catalog. (Their debut album Con La Muerte a Tu Lado was just released and it’s amazing.) Two of its members are from South Central L.A. One lives in Koreatown, another in Anaheim, Orange County. None are from East L.A. They sing solely in Spanish and remind me of bands from other countries, mainly Umeå, Sweden—in the Ny Våg tradition of the Vicious—and Copenhagen—Gorilla Angreb and No Hope For The Kids—which sort of brings the sound back home to California because those Scandinavian bands borrowed heavily from Los Angeles’s past (late ‘70s Dangerhouse, especially). The irony didn’t escape me. I’m more conversant in the language of songs of many bands that are based 5,317 miles from Razorcake HQ than I am in some of the bands that live less than twenty miles away. It’s not like I’m trying to be willfully ignorant of punk in my hometown. That’s just the nature of the beast here in L.A. One mile past the last bus stop often is the end of the world.

Los Angeles is its own country. 

The up side is this: some of the best DIY punk in the world has been and is being made in Los Angeles. We have a rich, diverse heritage. One that’s as great as it is totally fucked and frustrating. But it’s this real fight to be heard—even in your neighborhood—to make meaningful music that gives it such vitality, such uniqueness. What do White Murder, Wreck Of The Zephyr, Thee Undertakers, Toys That Kill, Neighborhood Brats, Rough Kids, Spokenest, and Generacion Suicida have in common besides they’re active punk bands in L.A.? Not much, except they all rule in their own distinctive ways. And that’s what keeps being a punk in L.A. exciting. 

(via fille-ennuyeuse)

25 9 / 2014

thespithouse:

voidpie:

I’m honored i got to make this flyer for one of my favorite bands in hardcore :,-) goodnight sweet prince

hell yus

thespithouse:

voidpie:

I’m honored i got to make this flyer for one of my favorite bands in hardcore :,-) goodnight sweet prince

hell yus

(via lalalaetc)

22 9 / 2014

jamiesinverguenza:

[Image set: three colorful illustrations by Cristy Road. The first is of a woman with snakes for hair who is sitting as if meditating, while wearing  a t-shirt that says “fuck the embargo”. The second is of a young brown-skinned woman in underwear and stockings sitting and sewing a multi-colored Cuban flag. The third illustration if of two light-skinned young people, one with spiked green hair, kissing at what looks like a trash-filled landfill.]

timebasedmetadatagod:

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Artwork by artist and writer, Cristy C. Road.

Courtesy of Road’s official website, art as it appears above clockwise order:

  1. Raza Encendida. Ink, Marker, Fluid Acrylic, 6x11. 2009
  2. Another weekend . Ink, Marker, Fluid Acrylic, 9x12. 2009
  3. SIN VERGUENZA. Ink, Marker. 2014

Road, a queer Latina of Cuban descent, creates art based on social justice, queer counterculture, and punk rock. Aside from drawing and painting, Road is a performer with the all-queer spoken word road-show, SISTER SPIT: The Next Generation. 

above picture of Road courtesy of Third Woman Press.

To learn more about Road and her work visit her official website.

La cubanita más talentosa

22 9 / 2014

aminaabramovic:

like riot grrl as a scene wasn’t like woopsie daisy can’t believe no WOC wanted to sign up and join us there was legitimate hostility towards WOC during that movement that’s been documented as well as the inability for many riot grrls to understand intersections of oppression…

21 9 / 2014

derekneuland:

Deathrats- “Girl Style”

We’ve been taught to hate one another and we replicate their standards
We cut each other down to size, each of us starved and socialized
I’m sick of the punk boy revolution, its ordinary
When women can support women, that’s something revolutionary
Why lament the loss of our girl style then, when we’re just as angry now
Why do they look backward to Kathleen Hannah, when there are so many of us now
You’re not satisfied, well neither am I
If we’re hating each other, we’re hating ourselves
If we can’t trust each other we can’t trust ourselves

(via pantyraidpunx)

17 9 / 2014

muchachafanzine:

My chihuahua is my greatest fan. Donate here. 

I wanna pet that dog…

muchachafanzine:

My chihuahua is my greatest fan. Donate here

I wanna pet that dog…

17 9 / 2014

Photos of the DC Punk scene, 1979-1980 by Lucian Perkins.

(Source: suicidewatch, via lalalaetc)

03 9 / 2014

frequencies-of-cin:

LATINO PUNKFEST 2014, Day 2 @ the C-Squat.

Bands in these pics: La Misma, Sin Pudor

(via punkwoc)